post

Discover Ikebana: Demonstration and Introduction

Flower arrangements of subtle elegance known as Ikebana are for Westerners one of the most recognizable elements of Japanese heritage.

There is more to what the Japanese call “The Way of the Flower” than meets the eye, however. Flower arranging in Japan is a disciplined and meditative art form. It embodies ideals that for the Japanese govern the essence of taste and beauty, enable harmony with nature, and yield insight into how to cultivate personal tranquility amid the vagaries of human existence.

Yume Gardens Executive Director Patricia Deridder has studied and taught Ikebana flower arranging styles for more than four decades, in Japan, Europe, and the U.S. At 1:00 pm on Sunday, January 12, she will introduce the story and teachings of Ikebana from their beginnings in the 15th century, and demonstrate some of the basic arrangement methods that have emerged since, in different schools of this still-evolving tradition.

This event illuminating the spirit of Ikebana and the skills to practice it is free with regular Gardens admission.

post

Japanese Archery Ceremony

Shooting the Japanese bamboo bow was once a battlefield skill of samurai. Today kyu, “The Way of the Bow,” is a character-building art, a form of self-development that teaches the archer to cultivate technical precision, a clear mind, and freedom from distractions and fear.

Members of Tucson’s Arizona Kyudo Kai will draw their nearly eight-foot-long bows at Yume and let shafts fly from 1:00 to 3:00 pm on Sunday, January 26, 2020. They’ll also explain the ceremonial etiquette, traditional dress, and shooting procedures and stances that make Japanese archery a discipline for both body and mind, simultaneously competitive and meditative.

As an arrow feels the pull of the earth, you’ll feel the pull of kyu at this exceptional event, which is free for Yume members. Non-member admission is $16 for adults and $5 for children ages three to 15, and includes Gardens entry. Seating is limited and reservations are required.

You may reserve your place and buy tickets online (processing fees apply) or in person at the Gardens during business hours. To order advance non-refundable tickets online, click on “Events” at the top of any page in our website; in the dropdown menu that then opens, click on “Buy Tickets” and follow the purchasing instructions.

post

Artist Reception: “Spirit of the Land – Paintings by Emily King”

“Spirit of the Land” opens in the Art Gallery on February 7, 2020, with a reception for artist Emily King from 5 to 7 pm. Because the reception is being held after business hours, Yume’s gardens and museum will NOT be open to visitors at that time.

In her work, King explores the concept of tamashii – the way that Japanese culture is moved by the spirit of a place, a sight, or a being, enabling glimpses of life through moments of wonder and awe. At times realistic, at times dreamlike, her pieces capture the world of the soul as well as the mind.

The show runs until May 1, and all paintings in the gallery are for sale.

post

Spring Ikebana Floral Festival

Enjoy the beauty of dozens of signature floral compositions highlighting the wide breadth of flower arrangement styles in one of Japan’s most cherished art forms, during our Spring 2020 Ikebana Floral Festival.

As we do each year, we open the Gardens to the talented adepts of five different schools of Ikebana practice. The result: elegant floral displays throughout our grounds and buildings that reflect the harmony, discipline, and refinement of traditional Japanese flower arranging.

The festival runs from Thursday, February 20 through Friday, February 29 . Admission is free for members of the Gardens. Admission for non-members is $15 for adults and $5 for children ages three to 15, and includes entry to the entire Gardens, our Museum, and our Art Gallery.

Be sure to combine your visit with a walk through our permanent display of selections from our collection of more than 200 Ikebana vases and vessels – the largest in the nation. Made of ceramics, bamboo, bronze, lacquer, clay, and glass, some are more than a century old, others are contemporary; all are carefully designed to complement the Zen-like spirit of the flower arrangements they hold.

Festival parking is available in the lot inside our main gate on North Alvernon Way and on East Justin Lane, one half block south of the Gardens. Please DO NOT park on East Hampton Place, immediately north of Yume.