Between Folds: Origami Classical And Modern

Cleverly transforming a flat square of paper into three-dimensional sculpture through folding and without the use of scissors or glue is a beloved pastime in Japan among both children and adults, and dates from the Edo period (1603–1867).

Such paper folding – called origami – produces creations as wide-ranging as a person’s imagination. Enthusiasts make animals, from horses to rabbits; sea creatures, from whales to seahorses; insects, from crickets to butterflies; trees and flower blossoms; figures of geisha and samurai; and even action figures, such as cranes with movable wings.

“Between Folds: Origami Classical and Modern” features ingenious folded paper forms by origami artist M. Craig. Raised in Japan and America, “M, as she calls herself, holds a degree in Fine Arts and is co-founder of the Tucson Origami Club and has taught Japanese paper-folding techniques throughout the Tucson region since 1996. She has also exhibited at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum and the Tucson Botanical Gardens.

Our exhibition runs October 1 through December 31, and entrance is free with regular Gardens admission. Also of interest: a parallel exhibition of larger-than-life metal origami sculptures – “Origami in the Garden 2” – at the nearby Tucson Botanical Gardens until April 1, 2018.